Adjustments in hashish use aren’t considerably related to psychotic experiences

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Study participants were initially recruited in Europe at the age of 14, and follow-up examinations were carried out at ages 16, 19, and 22 years. Of the 552 subjects who cited use at age 19, 549 said they had at least one psychotic experience of some kind at age 19, ”the study notes.

Of the 552 participants, 37.9 percent reduced their cannabis use between the ages of 19 and 22, 33.5 percent did not change and 28.4 percent increased their use over a period of three years.

“More participants stated that they did not use cannabis at the age of 22 (31.5 percent) in the past year than at the age of 19 (23 percent),” the authors of the study write.

Closeup of young caucasian women smoking weed at home.  Focus on shared photoOf the participants, 37.9 percent reduced their cannabis use, 33.5 percent did not change their use and 28.4 percent increased their use from 19 to 22 years. / Photo by Getty Images

Average cannabis use rose between the ages of 19 and 22, however, with the age of first use “positively associated with a change in cannabis use between the two times”. Nonetheless, cannabis use was “not significantly associated with psychotic experiences at the age of 19 or 22”.

As one 22-year-old participant explained his experience, “I think that every time I got reasonably high there was definitely a motivation to stop, I started having paranoid thoughts. [although] not in a psychotic way … Taking a break stopped that so I think that was a good decision. “

The researchers observed a positive association between perceived stress and psychotic experiences at the age of 22. This “underscores the importance of stressful experiences for the development of psychosis independently of cannabis use,” they note.

“The occurrence of other psychiatric diagnoses explained the occurrence of PLEs better than cannabis use (or the male sex) at either time point.” /. Photo by Getty Images

“The occurrence of other psychiatric diagnoses explained the occurrence of PLEs at both times better than cannabis use (or the male sex). This could reflect the genetic overlap between multiple mental disorders or common environmental factors that contribute to both cannabis use disorder and other mental disorders, ”the authors conclude.

A recent study investigating cannabis use and bipolar disorder suggested that using the drug to self-medicate symptoms may make treating the disorder more difficult by “causing mood instability and psychosis in certain patients with bipolar disorder,” said Dr. Girish Subramanyan, a San Francisco psychiatrist.

Another study published last year showed that study participants who used highly potent cannabis products were twice as likely to report anxiety disorders than those who consumed products with lower potency.

A study by the BC Mental Health and Addictions Research Institute looked at cannabis use in psychotic patients in the first episode. “It is important that we observed that the patients who consumed cannabis had psychosis earlier than the patients who did not use cannabis,” according to heretohelp.ca.

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