Canadian examine: Weed-related emergency rooms for younger adults, though general visits earlier than and after legalization have been flat

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In a retrospective study, visits to an emergency room in Hamilton, Ontario were considered. for acute cannabis poisoning.

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Angela Stelmakowich FILE: The Emergency Room at St. Boniface Hospital in Winnipeg on Wednesday March 7, 2018. / FILE: The Emergency Room at St. Boniface Hospital in Winnipeg on Wednesday March 7, 2018. / Photo by Kevin King / Winnipeg Sun / Postmedia Network

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A graph in the study shows that associated post-legalized ED visits were also higher in 50-59 year olds, but roughly the same for 60-year-olds and older, and 30-39 year olds and over 40 to 49 year olds were lower.

According to the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Law (NORML), most of the increase in visits by 18-29 year olds centered on observation within the ED. “The authors speculated that this subgroup of patients likely consists of” new users … who seek medical help due to uncomfortable symptoms … that eventually resolve on their own with time and certainty, “reports NORML.

Overall, the study results show that after legalization, a larger proportion of patients had to be observed without intervention (25 percent versus 48 percent), blood tests and imaging tests decreased (53 percent versus 12 percent), and treatment with benzodiazepines increased (24 percent versus 24 percent) 51 percent).

“Legalization was not associated with a change in the rate of cannabis-related ED visits in our study,” the investigators write.

Additional research is needed to establish details Additional research is needed to establish details “regarding changes in cannabis consumption methods and trends in certain age groups”. /. Photo by Getty Images

However, secondary outcomes that were considered for the review included the number of visits broken down by age, length of stay, concurrent use, and clinical course in the ED. Additional research is needed to determine details “regarding changes in cannabis consumption methods and trends in certain age groups,” the study said.

A study published last year that involved 14 urban EDs in Alberta after legalization between October 1, 2013 and July 31, 2019 found a small increase in physical visits and calls to a poison control center.

“Although only three out of 1,000 ED visits within the period were due to cannabis, the number of ED presentations related to cannabis increased post-legalization by 3.1 (range between 11.5 and 12.6) visits per ED and month, “the study authors wrote under the time. Weed-related calls for poison control increased, and the researchers “saw increases in cannabis-related hyperemesis, inadvertent ingestion, and people dropping out of ED pretreatment,” the study added.

Additionally, a study published two years ago found that ED visits attributable to inhaled cannabis are more common than those attributable to edible cannabis, although the latter is associated with more acute psychiatric visits and more ED visits than expected .

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