Examine finds connection between heavy hashish use in adolescents and later untimely beginning

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About 20 percent of those who gave birth to premature births had used cannabis on a daily basis as teenagers.

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Emma spears

Publication date:

August 20, 202154 minutes agoRead for 2 minutes Join the conversation The results of the study show that the birth-related effects of cannabis use appear to affect only the most serious and frequent users.  / The results of the study show that the birth-related effects of cannabis use appear to affect only the most serious and frequent users. / Photo by LuckyBusiness / iStock / Getty Images Plus

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People who used cannabis frequently as teenagers may be more prone to having premature births, according to a new study from researchers in the UK and Australia.

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But those who smoked joints occasionally – or even semi-frequently – as teenagers needn’t panic. The results of the study show that the birth-related effects of cannabis use appear to affect only the most serious and frequent users.

Lead author Lindsey Hines, Ph.D., a research fellow at the University of Bristol’s Bristol Medical School, says the results suggest that more studies are needed on the effects of cannabis use in adolescents.

“Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug among young people. There is already evidence that increased cannabis use in adolescents increases the risk of poor mental health, but our results suggest that there may be other effects that individuals may not expect, ”Hines said in a statement.

“With the liberalization of regulations on legal use, there is a possibility that consumption by young people will increase in some countries. These results provide additional motivation to ensure that policy changes do not lead to increased usage by adolescents, ”she adds.

With the legalization and decriminalization of cannabis spreading around the world, consumption in the regions appears to have remained largely constant. For example, a recent analysis by researchers in Canada found that there was “poor evidence to support the claim” that youth cannabis use has increased since the drug was legalized in the country in October 2018.

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