New Zealand’s ‘inexperienced fairy’ has reduce off wings to offer free hashish to the aged

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The man and his son both do not plead guilty on all counts.

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Angela Stelmakowich Thirty plants outside as well as cannabis and CBD oil and balms inside were confiscated from the house.  /. Thirty plants outside as well as cannabis and CBD oil and balms inside were confiscated from the house. /. Photo from iStock / Getty Images Plus

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Jason Tong, dubbed the “green fairy” in recent years for his efforts to give free cannabis to elderly New Zealanders in pain, pleaded not guilty to cannabis-related charges and called on the police to prosecute to drop.

Tong argued that he had done nothing wrong, just trying to help those in need, pleading guilty not to provide one count of possession of cannabis with intent and two counts of supply of a Class C controlled drug, RNZ reports.

In fact, neither Tong nor his son, who helped his father support the elderly, filed no guilty lawsuits.

  1. There are

    Australian doctors advised against prescribing medical cannabis for chronic pain

  2. FILE: Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announces severance pay for nurses during a press conference in Parliament on Aug. 7, 2018 in Wellington, New Zealand.  / PHOTO BY / MARK TANTRUM / GETTY IMAGES

    “People who are criminalized for possession are, in my opinion, not supported by most New Zealanders.”

  3. Police discovered 353 marijuana plants inside that they estimated could produce more than $ 475,000 worth of cannabis.  /.

    Kiwi Property Manager turned a blind eye to the weed farm in a rented apartment owned by his father’s company

Tong suggested to RNZ that he didn’t want to become a “green fairy”. It was something that developed after his son was diagnosed with cancer and he began researching alternative drugs. He found cannabis helped with his back pain, while his wife reported it helped with arthritis in her hands.

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It’s simply about doing your part to help seniors who are in pain in various conditions but either can’t find effective medications or don’t have the money to pay for what works, Tong noted. It also helped that he had the help of a medical marijuana advocate, he told RNZ.

There certainly seemed to be a need. After Tong began growing more cannabis plants and posting footage of them in his neighborhood, he received dozens of comments from elderly people who couldn’t afford other drugs.

But last month, Tong was the subject of a police raid that confiscated 30 plants outside and cannabis and CBD oil and balms inside. “We had just hacked all of our outdoor plants from the summer, so they took medication in one fell swoop for almost a year,” he said in an interview.

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Tong argues that the raid was misguided as his cannabis cultivation and the products that were made available to the elderly had nothing to do with money. In fact, he is not making a profit and emphasizes that efforts are based on helping people.

“I don’t think we’re hurting anyone. The people we care agree with adults and many of them don’t want to go the pharmaceutical route, ”he added.

New Zealand police report that cannabis-related penalties range from a fine of AU $ 500 ($ 475) for possession to a 14-year prison term for supply or manufacture. For cultivation, indictment, and depending on the amount, this could result in a seven-year prison sentence or an immediate two-year prison sentence and / or a fine of AU $ 2,000 ($ 1,900).

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Recreational cannabis is not legal in New Zealand. Last year’s referendum to legalize the plant hardly failed when 50.7 percent of the Kiwis voted “no”.

A thumbs up would have tabled a bill aimed at legalizing regulated commercial cannabis production and distribution, as well as home-growing, while restricting the availability and use of weed to those 20-year-olds and older, according to an article earlier this year in TheLancet.

Medical cannabis has been legal in New Zealand for over a year, but is only legally available with a prescription, according to the Drug Foundation.

However, many patients with severe and debilitating medical conditions continue to have access to the illicit market as most of the New Zealanders who need them remain inaccessible, according to the foundation.

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A thumbs up would have presented a bill to legalize regulated commercial cannabis production and distribution.  /. A thumbs up would have presented a bill to legalize regulated commercial cannabis production and distribution. /. Photo by Imabase / iStock / Getty Images Plus

“The cost is too high because products are not subsidized,” and there is the barrier that some doctors do not prescribe cannabis or related products “because of a lack of training and understanding of prescribing protocols,” he adds.

RNZ reported that some have suggested that law enforcement against “green fairies” in New Zealand appears to have stepped up.

In Tong’s case, he told the publication that he had gone to his doctor and now prescribed seven types of pain relievers to replace cannabis.

There were few Twitter replies to the article, but they were all on the same page. “This man is a hero,” remarked one poster.

The answers were pretty tame, but certainly not supportive of the prosecution. “New Zealand had an opportunity to change that in a referendum last year,” noted one. “Well done @nzpolice, save the world …” added another.

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