Secondhand smoke tips ought to transcend tobacco to hashish to regulate teenage publicity at residence

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More and more adults in U.S. states with legalized medicinal or recreational weed are consuming the plant and potentially exposing children to smoking in dormitories.

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Angela Stelmakowich In states with legal recreational herbs, 11.9 percent of adults said they had used them in the past month.  /. In states with legal recreational herbs, 11.9 percent of adults said they had used them in the past month. /. Photo by Jeff W on Unsplash

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Adults in states that have legalized cannabis and that also have children at home use weeds more often than in states without legal use, US researchers have found.

According to Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health (CUMSPH), whose study partners included Columbia Irving Medical Center and City University of New, legalization for recreational and medical use was with a significantly higher prevalence of cannabis use over the past month and connected in daily cannabis use York.

“Legalization for recreational use has been associated with significant leaps in cannabis use among adults with children living at home. The impact of legalization for medical purposes has been more focused on older parents with higher incomes and higher levels of education, ”the statement said.

  1. How legalization has affected youth use of weeds is decidedly mixed.  / PHOTO BY GEOFF ROBINS / AFP / GETTY IMAGES

    According to a Canadian study, legalizing recreational herbs has not reduced youth use as expected


  2. Juvenile weed use in California rose among low-risk groups after cannabis legalization: Report

  3. The researchers reviewed a cross-sectional sample of 200 YouTube vaping videos from 2016 to 2020. /

    The researchers argue that age restrictions are required to prevent easy access to weed control videos on YouTube

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The results, which appear in Addiction, are based on data from the 2004-2017 National Drug Use and Health Survey, which included people 12 years and older to determine 30-day cannabis use and daily cannabis use by age.

In states with legal recreational herbs, 11.9 percent of adults said they had used them in the past month. This equates to 9.3 percent for states that have only legalized medical marijuana and 6.1 percent for states with no legalization laws.

In terms of daily cannabis use, the percentages broke up similar lines. Overall, 4.2 percent of adults reported being consumed daily in recreational cannabis states, 3.2 percent in medicine-only states, and 2.3 percent in non-legal states.

The rise in cannabis use among children and children living in a recreational cannabis state means that control and harm reduction efforts that parents are involved in may need to be adjusted. Traditionally, protecting youth from second-hand tobacco smoke at home has centered on parents smoking cigarettes to ensure a smoke-free home and not to smoke in front of children.

“If legalization for medical or recreational purposes has increased cannabis use among adults living with children at home, adults deserve education about the risks of second-hand smoking for adolescents, as well as information about other risks to their children associated with parental control Cannabis use, ”says lead researcher on the study, epidemiologist Renee Goodwin of CUMSPH.

It is important to find out how much cannabis use has increased among adults with children in the household.  /. It is important to find out how much cannabis use has increased among adults with children in the household. /. Photo by Cambridge Jenkins IV on Unsplash

Goodwin argues that due consideration has not yet been given to the education and potential risks of used cannabis smoke, and suggests that public health guidelines and clinical treatment of parents available for tobacco should also be developed for marijuana.

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, used marijuana smoke contains “many of the same toxic chemicals in smoked tobacco” and smoked cannabis contains “many of the same carcinogenic substances as smoked tobacco”. That said, there are still many unanswered questions about exposure and its impact on chronic disease, the information says.

A study published in 2019 found that after exposure to cigarette smoke and other covariates, exposure to cigarette smoke and other covariates was controlled, children were more likely to report a greater number of adverse health effects “for children of families who smoke indoor cannabis compared to families who didn’t smoke “. And while the results “do not indicate a statistically significant association,” the extent of the (insignificant) association between indoor cannabis smoking and adverse health outcomes requires further study.

According to a 2018 post from Harvard Medical School, “As the legal use of marijuana becomes more common, we need to create the same rules and laws that we created to protect people from second-hand tobacco smoke.”

“Exposure to second-hand cannabis smoke poses a number of undesirable health risks for adolescents, and adolescents with parents who use cannabis are at increased risk of using cannabis themselves,” Goodwin said in the statement.

Therefore, it is important to find out how much cannabis use has increased among adults with children in the household, she claims. “Educational efforts to reduce children’s exposure to used cannabis smoke can be critical to protecting children in times of new or rapidly changing cannabis policies.”

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