The examine means that legalizing hashish will increase weed consumption in the course of the pre-conception interval

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Public health interventions and cannabis education should focus on prejudice times.

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Angela Stelmakowich Investigators found that the prevalence of self-reported cannabis use increased from 11.74 percent before legalization to 19.38 percent after legalization during the prejudice period.  /. Investigators found that the prevalence of self-reported cannabis use increased from 11.74 percent before legalization to 19.38 percent after legalization during the prejudice period. /. Photo by Getty Images / iStock Photo

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A study comparing groups of pregnant women before and after cannabis legalization in Canada showed that the latter group was 71 percent more likely to use weeds during the prejudice phase.

The observational study looked at two groups – pregnant women before and after legalization – and tried to compare rates of cannabis use, cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and street drug use during prejudice and pregnancy. The screening was open to any pregnant person in BC who was 19 years of age or older.

Investigators found that the prevalence of self-reported cannabis use increased from 11.74 percent before legalization to 19.38 percent after legalization during the prejudice period. While the researchers also noted increased use during pregnancy, increasing from 3.64 percent to 4.62 percent for the pre- and post-legalization groups, the change was not statistically significant.

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  1. The researchers collected data from participants aged 14 to 24 years.

    Visits to public health nurses help reduce cannabis and cigarette use during pregnancy


  2. Pregnant and nursing mothers should avoid cannabis


  3. Decades of studies show that using cannabis during pregnancy is not as dangerous as we thought

The study shows that legalization was not associated with significant changes in cigarette smoking, alcohol use, or drug use during prejudice and pregnancy.

While this was also the case with cannabis during pregnancy, it was not the case during the prejudice period. “Adjusted for potential disruptive factors, the group had significantly higher chances of cannabis use after legalization during the prejudice period,” the study says.

“Studies examining the effects of cannabis use on perinatal outcomes, as well as public health interventions and education programs related to cannabis use, should focus on the prejudice period,” the study’s authors recommend.

In another study, Canadian researchers suggested that In another study, Canadian researchers suggested that “cannabis use is not known to be safe while pregnant or breastfeeding”. /. Photo by ruizluquepaz / iStock / Getty Images Plus

A recently published study, this time outside the US, found that cannabis users were 41 percent less likely to get pregnant per menstrual cycle than non-users. In addition, 42 percent of cannabis users became pregnant during the study, compared to 66 percent of participants who did not use weeds.

Also in the US, researchers found that legalization could lead to more weeds, meaning more pregnant women who smoke could expose their developing babies to THC. In Michigan in particular, there was a 32.5 percent increase in THC-exposed newborns in a hospital between 2018 and 2019.

And a study from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont. It is recommended to be careful: “There is no known safe use of cannabis during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Pregnant women should be advised about the risks of exposure in the uterus and encouraged to refrain from using it during pregnancy and while breastfeeding, ”the investigators write.

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