Younger adults are sentenced to 3 years in jail for promoting weed brownies on social media

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Entrepreneurs used Facebook and Instagram to sell their apparently homemade groceries in Mexico.

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Angela Stelmakowich The search of all four of the involved parties' homes led to the discovery of weed brownies, cannabis, saucepans, ovens, flour, packaging, cell phones and cash.  /. The search of all four of the involved parties’ homes led to the discovery of weed brownies, cannabis, saucepans, ovens, flour, packaging, cell phones and cash. /. Photo by Getty Images

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A subsequent police search of all four houses of the people involved led to the discovery of weed brownies, cannabis, saucepans, ovens, flour, packaging, cell phones and cash, reports Mexico News Daily.

During a summary hearing earlier this month, the four were sentenced to three years in prison after accepting “petty drug trafficking charges,” the publication said. The full names of the four people did not appear on the news, despite the fact that their ages were listed as 18, 21, 22 and 29 years old.

A tweet from Sonora’s attorney general issued a warning that anyone who consumes the products “can not only become addicted, but also seriously harm their health”. Sellers “could also be responsible for murder because of the toxic properties of consuming marijuana-containing foods,” Mexico News Daily cites the tweet as a hint.

Mexico passed a law to legalize cannabis in March, but recreational herbs are not yet legal in the country. The bill needs final approval by the Mexican Senate before the legalized production of cannabis for industrial, medical and recreational uses is officially given the go-ahead.

In a blog report, Brookings reports that the new law (if approved) will mean “anyone over 18 in Mexico can buy and own less than 28 grams of cannabis”. Having more on hand and growing cannabis is punishable by fines and / or imprisonment.

It’s not the first time that social media has been the vehicle for illicit cannabis trafficking that resulted in a person being fingered.

For example, a 23-year-old Utah man whose Snapchat handle was “VitusGod” was charged in real life after police found his drug deal conveniently featured on the platform. In Texas, a 20-year-old man faces money laundering charges after police found his Snapchat photos and videos promoting THC vape cartridges and weed for sale at a Sonic drive-in.

And last summer in the UK, an Evening Standard investigation into using platforms like Instagram to sell cannabis, cocaine and other drugs prompted authorities to crack down on digital drug transactions.

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